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STRONG VOICES

Janet Gray, Ph.D.
Janet Gray, Ph.D.

As author of our 2008 and 2010 State of the Evidence reports, Dr. Gray drives the science behind all our work.

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Resources & Acknowledgements

Approach to Reviewing the Literature

In selecting articles for inclusion in the Breast Cancer Fund’s updated review of the complex and substantial literature addressing connections between breast cancer and environmental chemicals and radiation, we focused on published and in-press, peer-reviewed articles. We selected additions to earlier versions of our reviews, which were published both on this website and in State of the Evidence: The Connection between Breast Cancer and the Environment (sixth edition, Breast Cancer Fund, 2010) primarily from the burgeoning literature since 2009. 

We chose topics for inclusion in our review either because: (a) at least several studies from different research disciplines (e.g., human epidemiological, animal models, cell culture, etc.) provided evidence for a link between the chemical or source of radiation and increased risk for breast cancer; or (b) evidence suggests that the chemical exerts effects on biological systems, especially endocrine systems, in ways that have been implicated in increased risk for development of breast cancer, even when a direct link between that particular chemical and risk for breast cancer has not yet been studied extensively. 

Articles for inclusion were identified through SCOPUS, Web of Science and PubMed databases using key words (e.g., names of chemicals); phrases (e.g., breast cancer, mammary development, timing of exposures); and authors’ names. When points of disagreement occur in the literature, we present and discuss those differences and we examine possible explanations for the discrepancies in results. Because of the breadth of literature on environmental influences on breast cancer risk, this review is not all-inclusive; rather, it highlights most of the important publications and themes. Where substantial changes were made in revisions from previous versions, and especially when these new sections included potentially controversial findings, expert colleagues in the field reviewed and offered editorial suggestions on updated sections.

Acknowledgements

Author

Janet Gray, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Psychology; Director, Program in Science, Technology and Society
Vassar College
Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

Vassar Support Staff

Katie Garrison
Margaret Hankins

Breast Cancer Fund Contributing Authors

Sharima Rasanayagam, Ph.D.
Connie Engel, Ph.D.

Science Reviewers

Agneta Åkesson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology
Institute of Environmental Medicine
Karolinska Institutet
Stockholm, Sweden

Kristan Aronson, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology
Queens University
Kingston, Ontario, Canada

Elisa Bandera, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Epidemiology
UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
New Brunswick, N.J.

Barbara Cohn, Ph.D.
Director
Child Health and Developmental Studies
Berkeley, Calif.

Susan Kutner, M.D.
General Surgery
Kaiser Permanente
San Jose, Calif.

Susan Pinney, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Environmental Health
UC College of Medicine
University of Cincinnati
Cincinnati, Ohio

Public Policy Translation

Nancy Buermeyer, MS, Breast Cancer Fund
Janet Nudelman, MA, Breast Cancer Fund
Gretchen Lee Salter, Breast Cancer Fund

Editors

Shannon Coughlin, Breast Cancer Fund
Elizabeth Bell

Web Project Managers

Marisa Walker, Breast Cancer Fund
Kelly Goldsmith, Breast Cancer Fund
Rebecca Wolfson, Breast Cancer Fund

Advisor

Jeanne Rizzo, RN, Breast Cancer Fund

Funders

Passport Foundation
John Merck Fund
Clif Bar Family Foundation
Jenifer Altman Foundation
Cohen Family Fund
Twinkle Foundation